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1st Annual Providence Spring Cleaning Earth Day Event Power Point

From the author, Professor Laura Prieto….

This project is quite dear to me; it traces the history of a playground, the Gladys Potter Garden [known locally as Humbolt or the Baby Park]. The essay is very long, with photos and footnotes as well, and ideally I’d like to drive people to the Subjecting History website where maybe they will feel compelled to comment online.

My essay, “In Loving Memory of her Little Girl: Past, Present, and Place in the Gladys Potter Garden,” is available online through an exciting project called _Subjecting History_, edited by Trevor Getz and Thomas Padilla. You can find it here:

http://subjectinghistory.org/in-loving-memory/

laura.prieto@simmons.edu

Laura R. Prieto
Chair, Department of History
Professor, History / Women’s and Gender Studies Simmons College
300 The Fenway C319-F
Boston, MA 02115
The project collects over a dozen essays, global in scope, about alternative ways of perceiving the past, that is, considering academic history as just one sort of interpretation among many forms of memory, of public and political engagement with the past. In its first stage, for the next several weeks, the whole volume is open for public commentary. You can read more about the project and the process of posting comments below. All of us contributors are hoping for broad community engagement, not just by scholars but by the general public, leading to a lively conversation that will help shape our essays for their eventual publication in a printed anthology.I hope you will find time to read my work, and to share your thoughts and questions on the site. Please help us spread the word to anybody else you imagine would be interested. I would like to put up a flyer in the park about the project once the weather warms up and there are more visitors. I’d also welcome your ideas on how else we might work together.

Best wishes, and many thanks for your support, Laura

What is the Subjecting History project?

Subjecting History is a collaboration between professional scholars and the public to explore the way that we individually and

collectively interpret events from the past.   This collaboration occurs in the digital space of http://www.subjectinghistory.org .   On this website, seventeen scholars ? mostly historians, but also others ? have published articles on history and the way it is studied, commemorated, remembered, and contested.   We are currently inviting scholars and members of the public to visit this website and comment on the papers that are of interest to them.  Our purpose is to explore how we can build a more democratic process for understanding the past and its role in society today.   Ultimately, the contributors will reflect on the contributions made by commenters, and the project will be published by Ohio University Press.

Navigating Subjecting History

The Subjecting History website includes seventeen articles on the relationship between scholarly and popular ways of interpreting the past.  You can navigate between these articles using the ?Contents?

tab on the right-hand side of the website.  You can also view recent activity using the ?Activity? tab and view recent comments on particular papers or on the website as a whole using the ?Comments? tab.

How to comment

Leave a comment on paragraph: At the far left-hand side of the main text, there are paragraph symbols. By clicking on the paragraph symbol ¶, a comment field will be opened on the right-hand side of the page.

Enter name and email to submit a comment. At the far right-hand side of the page, each article will have an index of every paragraph in the main text. Clicking on portions of this index will highlight the corresponding portions of the text. Enter name and email to submit a comment.

Leave a comment on a comment: Readers also have the option to comment directly upon other readers comments. Direct replies to specific reader comments will form their own branches, and store distinct strands of conversation on the right-hand side of the page. To comment directly on a comment, click on the ?Reply to? under that comment.

All commenters understand that their comments may be printed in the physical version of this text, to be produced by Ohio University Press. In order to cut back on spam, all commenters must enter their name and email address to submit a comment. The Editors will not share email addresses with any source, nor will they make email addresses publicly available.

No login is required to comment on any portion of Subjecting History.

However, in order to cut back on spam, all commenters must enter their name and email address to submit a comment. The Editors will not share email addresses with any source, nor will they make email addresses publicly available.

All commenters understand that their comments may be printed in the physical version of this text, to be produced by Ohio University Press.